Tag Archives: sedition

What exactly is Sedition?

As the first indictments are coming down from the riot that occurred at the Capitol last week, the allegation of sedition has been referenced several times. Since it’s not a statute that is prosecuted very frequently, I thought it worth considering the legal definition. Federal Law defines “Seditious Conspiracy” under 18 U.S. Code ยง 2384 as “…two or more persons in any State or Territory, or in any place subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, conspire to overthrow, put down, or to destroy by force the Government of the United States, or to levy war against them, or to oppose by force the authority thereof, or by force to prevent, hinder, or delay the execution of any law of the United States, or by force to seize, take, or possess any property of the United States contrary to the authority thereof…” It’s a felony that carries a fine or a prison sentence up to 20 years. It certainly seems that those rioters who occupied the Capitol building would be subject to prosecution under this statute.

First, it requires that two or more people be conspiring, and there were hundreds working together to breech the Capitol building, so that element is satisfied. While it mentions putting down the government, which is arguable, it also includes other ways to break the law including levying war, oppose the authority of, hinder the execution of law or most notably, “by force to seize, take, or possess any property of the United States”. That certainly seems to be an apt description of the mass of people who breeched the Capitol building and occupied it. The Federal government certainly could make a case that the activity was seditious, especially if more information were to come out about conspiratorial actions in the lead up to the riot.

Some have suggested the President could also be criminally liable for the inflammatory language he used preceding the riot. It would be difficult for him to face criminal liability, though he not need be present to have conspired to commit a crime. Conspiracy charges, such as Seditious Conspiracy, punish not only the direct actors, but those that conspire with them. However, since the President did not directly call for invading the building, it would be difficult to make a case without something more. If things come to light over time that suggests there were actions or conversations with the President and those intending violence at the Capitol, he could face criminal liability, but his bigger concern is probably being held civilly liable.

The first indictments related to the riot have been issued, and sedition charges have not been filed against those individuals, including one who did enter the building. Mark Leffingwell does face a felony charge under the Federal Anti-Riot act for allegedly interfering with an officer during a civil disorder. He faces several other charges, including assault on law enforcement. The other individual is Lonnie Coffman, who was caught later in the day with weapons and a bunch of Molotov cocktails in his vehicle: he also faces felony charges. Dozens more have been arrested, and at least one law enforcement officer died, so many more charges are slated to come down, including homicide for anyone responsible for the officers death.

*UPDATE The FBI indicated this afternoon they are considering an array of charges, including possible sedition charges.