Tag Archives: fwc

You Need a Permit to Kill an Alligator in Florida

molest gator

Alligator Warning Sign

Apparently it bears repeating, as a man was arrested this week in Palm Beach County for illegally killing an alligator. Yes, they are everywhere, but Florida has a complex wildlife management system, and you have to have a permit and tag before you can hunt for gators. If not, you can be convicted of a crime! Florida takes its wildlife regulations very seriously…

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Governor Rick Scott wants to Raise Law Enforcement Pay

Rick Scott

Gov. Rick Scott

Governor Rick Scott announced this week that he is seeking a budget allocation to increase the pay of correctional officers and probation officers. These officers are surprisingly underpaid, starting at under $30,000, which has made it difficult to fill positions and retain officers. The State doesn’t even provide a firearm to probation officers that have to go out in the field to visit felons.

A few weeks ago he also announced that he is seeking a raise for state law enforcement officers, including FHP troopers, as well as FDLE, FWC and other agencies. The requested raise is modest, but probably overdue. I was speaking to some officers in court recently, and was surprised to see troopers leaving FHP to work in local departments, but the financial incentive was just too great. Fair pay is essential for maintaining the quality of our law enforcement officers.

The pay raises will still have to be discussed during the upcoming budget negotiations, and are far from a done deal. Not only is there concern of a deficit, Governor Scott is hoping to cut the budget by over $600 million. Some tough decisions will have to be made, but the law enforcement and corrections raises need to come sooner than later.

Man Cited for Alligator Parts Scattered Around Vehicle

alligator parts.jpg

photo courtesy FWC

Working to be your leading Alligator-law related blog, we bring you this story from the FWC. FWC officers stopped a man driving a truck through a wildlife management area to check for his day-use pass, only to find dismembered alligator parts stashed around his vehicle. Upon questioning, the man admitted he had recently killed the alligator without permission.

Alligators can now be legally hunted in Florida, like deer and other animals, but alligator hunts are closely regulated. Know your laws before you hunt… or fish: Florida takes wildlife management seriously.

And be sure of what you’re doing. Don’t be like Bryan Rohm. He was out hunting an alligator with his son (legally!) and thought he had killed it. He was sorely mistaken, and when he brought it in the boat, the alligator bit his thumb and jumped back into the water. He had shot the gator twice with the bang-stick, an alligator hunting device (basically it delivers a shotgun blast at point blank range), and wasn’t able to stop the thing. Alligators are badasses.

So, It’s Illegal to RESCUE a Gator

Baby Gator in Cape Coral

Baby Gator in Cape Coral

A couple of unnamed Cape residents saw a baby Alligator wandering in an intersection on Halloween night, and decided to rescue the little guy. It’s clearly a baby, as it is only a foot long, and still has its baby spots, which fade after a few years. The Samaritans scooped up the little guy, only to be stopped by CCPD before they could find a safe place to release it. It’s a crime to possess an Alligator in Florida! Fortunately, Officer Pinkham was sympathetic, and called in FWC to safely relocate the little guy, without charging the Samaritans. Yay, rescued gator!

If you see a Gator in distress, or being a threat or nuisance, it is incumbent to call FWC, at 866-FWC-GATOR (866-392-4286).

Alligator Warning Sign

Alligator Warning Sign

The “We don’t know where the cobra is” owner has been Charged

Mike Kennedy and one of his Snakes

Mike Kennedy and one of his Snakes

Mike Kennedy, previously famous for being on Discovery Channel’s “Airplane Repo” has earned new notoriety this week for allowing his deadly, 8-foot King Cobra snake to escape from the Orlando home where keeps it. While he has the proper permits for the snake, he is now facing criminal charges because hefailed to proptly report the snake’s escape.

Several media outlets are reporting that the charge carries a fine of $366. However, the Orange County Clerk’s page indicates that Mr. Kennedy has been charged with a level 2 FWC rule violation, which  could potentially subject him to up to 60 days in jail, as a second degree misdemeanor. FWC rules specifically state that an owner of this type of venomous, non-indigenous snake must report an escape immediately.

Authorities are still looking to locate Squidge the snake and return him safeliy to captivity.

Collier Man Charged for Breeding Alligators

Charles Edwards

Charles Edwards

It is illegal in Florida to possess an Alligator. Charles Edwards, aka “Half-Breed”, a Collier County resident, was caught with a dozen baby gators being held in an aquarium under his apartment, in a storage area. Investigators think he may have been trying to sell them. He is still sitting in jail, as he has not been able to post bond. Possession of an alligator is a felony charge in Florida. The State of Florida has chosen to give heightened protection to gators, even though their numbers have rebounded, and are no longer endangered. Regardless of your opinion of the policy, gators are protected under Florida law.

Naples Man Arrested for Keeping an Alligator in his 3-Year-Old’s Room

  • FWC: Man thought having a pet gator was cool

  • James Gill Facing Felony

James Gill, of Naples

James Gill, of Naples

James Gill, 45, of Naples caught an alligator in his backyard, and thought it would be cool to keep it as a pet. He put the young gator in a fish tank in his 3-year-old son’s room. That’s extremely dangerous, even little gators have 80 sharp teeth. FWC served a warrant, and charged him with a felony for illegal possession of an alligator. Gill reportedly told officers that it was stupid that it was a felony, because there are millions of them. He may be right, but it’s still against the law, and extremely dangerous.

via Florida Man