Tag Archives: brendan dassey

Inmate Tries to Claim Reward Money in Theresa Halbach’s Murder by Claiming that he did it

Joseph Evans

A convicted murdered has written a letter claiming that he was actually responsible for the death of Theresa Halbach. Halbach is the young woman who was the victim in the case for which Steven Avery and his nephew, Brendan Dassey, have been convicted of murder. Avery’s post-conviction attorney has released the letter from Joseph Evans, who is already serving a life-sentence for murdering his wife in 2008. Evan’s letter comes on the heels of an announcement that there is now a $100,000 reward for the arrest and conviction of the real killer of Theresa Halbach. Evans specifically cites the reward as the reason he’s coming forward with his so-called confession.

Avery’s lawyer Kathleen Zellner is unimpressed by the claimed confession. Not only is his financial motive clear, he previously tried to play the other side a few years ago, writing that Avery had confessed to him when they were cellmates. The guy has no credibility. Zellner was more blunt, saying it is “worthless, unless it is corroborated.” She does indicate that the defense is continuing, notwithstanding this distraction, and that they have received some credible tips. In the meantime, Zellner is continuing her appellate fight for a new trial, with her brief coming due in a few weeks.

What’s going on in the To Make a Murderer Cases

Steven Avery, whose case was documented on “Making a Murderer” had filed a motion for new trial, alleging new evidence that would support granting him a new trial. The trial court denied the motion without a hearing, indicating that Avery’s attorney Katherine Zellner, had not met the legal standard for that type of motion in Wisconsin. Currently, that ruling is being appealed, but it’s fairly early in the appellate process: Zellner has not filed her brief yet.

Brendan Dassey, the young cousin of Avery, is still fighting to get his verdict overturned. He had gone through the State appeals process, when he then got a positive ruling from a Federal judge, finding his confession was illegally obtained and dismissing the trial result. However, a Federal Appellate court overturned that ruling, reinstating his conviction. He is now petitioning to the U.S. Supreme Court. The SCOTUS only takes a relatively few cases each year, and Wisconsin will likely be filing a brief arguing that there is no issue that needs to be addressed by SCOTUS. If the Supreme Court does not hear the case, Dassey could end up filing for a new trial as Avery has done.